Featured Post

It's My 2nd Blogiversary!!!|Giveaway

Friday, April 15, 2016

True Born By L.E. Sterling|Review


True Born (True Born Trilogy #1)
Published by Entangled: Teen on May 3rd, 2016
Genre: Young Adult Science Fiction
Pages: 304
Format: eGalley
Rating:

Welcome to Dominion City. After the great Plague descended, the world population was decimated...and their genetics damaged beyond repair. The Lasters wait hopelessly for their genes to self-destruct. The Splicers pay for expensive treatments that might prolong their life. The plague-resistant True Borns are as mysterious as they are feared… And then there's Lucy Fox and her identical twin sister, Margot. After endless tests, no one wants to reveal what they are. When Margot disappears, a desperate Lucy has no choice but to put her faith in the True Borns, led by the charismatic Nolan Storm and the beautiful but deadly Jared Price. As Lucy and the True Borns set out to rescue her sister, they stumble upon a vast conspiracy stretching from Dominion’s street preachers to shady Russian tycoons. But why target the Fox sisters? As they say in Dominion, it’s in the blood.

My Thoughts

NetGalley Review I have to be honest, I was a little disappointed in the first few chapters. It started out just like every other YA novel. The love interest is introduced immediately and in the most conventional way, saving Lucy’s life, which I’m still a little confused how the two were positioned in that scene. It took me a while to adapt to Sterling’s writing style and first person point of view. There were many points where the story dragged on and a few scenes that encouraged me to continue reading. I applaud Sterling on her suspenseful action scenes. Fast-paced scenes are tremendously draining to write, L. E. Sterling makes it look effortless. The entire plot is unique and veers slightly from most of today’s dystopian books. I am incredibly grateful that I read this book as an ebook because with all of the characters and new definitions things can get a little twisted. At first, I was overwhelmed. The definitions were vague and I still have a rough concept of a few plot points and terms. I don’t think certain groups were explained thoroughly enough to completely comprehend what their true purpose was. Lucy is a little helpless. Her character always seemed to be pouting, whining, or leading herself into terrible situations in which Jared would come and rescue her. There wasn’t much to her character other than her ability to physically feel her sister’s pain. Lucy did have a tendency to put her sister’s health ahead of her’s, even Jared addresses this, I just wish his advice would pass through her thick skull just as easily as his incredibly good looks. I get it, he’s gorgeous! Let’s continue on with the story. In many of the action scenes, she kind of just stood around, waiting for someone to do something. There is a lot of fluff within this book. I would read three or four paragraphs of Lucy’s thoughts, background information, or just anything that seemed relevant to add before returning to what was actually happening and by then I’d completely forgotten what was happening. One aggravating thing about YA romances is the immediate introduction of the main character’s love interests. I find it annoying when starting a book and the effortlessly beautiful main character is introduced without the slightest clue that they were described as the perfect human being. A flawless, virtuous girl meets a rebellious, arrogant guy who inevitably drives her insane with his wise cracks and charming looks. I’m tired of it! Obviously, the two characters are going to end up together, so why waste so much time, effort, and paper by adding useless fluff? Now, I’m not saying that I approve of Lucy's and Jared's relationship. Honestly, if someone acted like Jared did in the first chapter, I’d avoid them at all cost. I understand you want to get the story rolling immediately, however, genuine love doesn’t happen in a blink of an eye. An instant connection just doesn’t appeal to me, nor is it entirely realistic. But neither is the concept of the story. I am curious to find out where Sterling takes the story.

No comments:

Post a Comment